Foxy Brown


In the beginning of their careers, it seemed like the two would be able to get along. They both agreed to do a collaboration with Total, also featuring Da Brat, and the video is similar to the bank robbing females in the movie Set It Off. It reminds me of that movie, showing the unity of black females and their rebellion against society.

Total feat. Foxy Brown, Lil Kim, and Da Brat- “No One Else (Remix)”

It would appear that Foxy Brown and Lil Kim are on the same team, but the truth is far from that.

Foxy Brown and Lil Kim have had an ongoing rivalry since the late 90’s. Quite frankly, I doubt that most people remember the exact time that the beef began or who is responsible for initiating the verbal attacks. The only memorable thing is that the rivalry has gone on for years. As a matter of fact, the battle has lasted and persisted for the majority of both of their careers.

The rivalry between the two MCs may have started with the artists but was definitely fueled by the media. It began because the two women have approached rap in a similar manner and there can only be one to wear the BEST title. Both have similar backgrounds, growing up in Brooklyn, New York and the two twist the male domination of rap to (more…)

Never have I read such a good piece of writing that compares rappers Lil Kim and Foxy Brown. I found an essay entitled “What is Freedom? A critique of Foxy Brown and Lil Kim.” This essay makes so many valid points on the ongoing debate about who is the better MC. The two rappers are usually compared because of their similar image and style. Both represent a woman that flips the script and acts like one of the boys in rap while maintaining a sexy image, but Lil Kim has had more success. Bell hooks says this about Lil Kim, “Donning blond wigs and getting a boob job so that she can resemble a cheap version of the white womanhood she adores wins her monetary success in the world of white supremacist, patriarchal capitalism and helps her cover up the fact that she has no self-worth.”

This is a harsh and cynical evaluation of Lil Kim but raises good questions about why Lil Kim is so much more successful than Foxy Brown. One theory is that Lil Kim is more attractive by White America’s standards of beauty. She has lighter skin, blonde hair, and resembles white beauty far more than Foxy does. Kim also built her career with the help of the Notorious B.I.G. With such a rap icon as this in her corner, (more…)

Rappers like Lil Kim and Foxy Brown have used their sexuality and bodies to sell records. Unlike MC Lyte and Queen Latifah, Foxy and Lil Kim have promoted their personas as being sexy, naughty, and rough females and embraced their sexualized images. Most of their lyrics reflect similar themes and subjects as male rappers. The obsession with money, power, and respect is manifested in their raps as they struggle to establish themselves as rap icons despite their femininity. The rap game is dominated by men who gain power by having as many women as possible and maintaining a reputation for being desirable and sought after. Females, especially heterosexuals, have to approach rap with an agenda to preserve their interest in men while also having the power to be sexy. It in interesting because many of their verses would be acceptable if they were not women. They choose to rap about the same topics as their male counterparts, but are targeted for being too explicit. Unlike their male counterparts, they put a female heterosexual perspective to “fucking bitches and getting money.” In this sense, the word bitch is replaced with the word “nigga,” but is used to refer to the same type of person. There are actually many different definitions of the words ‘nigga’ and ‘bitch’ but in simple terms, the word “bitch” could be replaced by the word “nigga” to make distictions between gender.

Although Christina Aguilera is not a rapper, her message about double standards between men and women is one that is often talked about by female rappers. In Christina’s video, Lil Kim’s verse (more…)

While doing research on Lil Kim and Foxy Brown, I ran across this article by Lori A. Tribbett-Williams entitled “Lil Kim and Foxy Brown- Caricature of Black Womanhoond” that articulates the possible negative affects of having women, specifically Black women, hyper sexualized in the media. The article points out why these images are acceptable and fall into categories that have been set up long before the careers of Lil Kim and Foxy Brown.

KIMfOXY

“Among the most commonly depicted images of African-American womanhood is the image of the promiscuous “temptress” known as Jezebel. The new generation of rappers, through their X-rated lyrics and fashions, breathe new life into Jezebel, a mythical caricature and distorted representation of African-American womanhood….This Note focuses primarily on the racist and sexist social construct known as the Jezebel, and the proliferation of the Jezebel image into rap music, particularly the music of the new generation of African-American female rap artists. Lil’ Kim and Foxy Brown are affectionately known as “gangsta bitches” and are credited as the catalysts for the revolutionary sexual persona of the new generation. They have established their fame largely because of their “barely there” fashions. Female rapper BOSS commented that “tight clothes mean ‘weak lyrics.” ‘ That being the case, Lil’ Kim and Foxy Brown are saying nothing lyrically, with respect to the social status of African-American women, but talking loud, since they are among the most successful of the contemporary female rap artists. The new generation personifies what has perhaps been the most destructive image of African-American womanhood, an image that African- American women have for centuries tried to “live down.” The Jezebel image, as glorified by emerging female rappers, continues to be resurrected from history and projects a distorted image of African-American womanhood.”

Prior to reading this article, I didn’t really pay attention to how significant female rap artists are in contributing to the few portrayals of Black women in the media. There is no surprise that the most successful female artists are African-American since rap has been tied and so intimately connected to the Black community. Although black women are expressing themselves via music, (more…)